Dangerous Wildfire Becomes a Giant Beast in NM

A fire in Ute Park is rapidly growing, forcing evacuations and devouring buildings in its path.

Nm Fire

June 02–EAGLE NEST — Jim Smith got an urgent call from his wife a little before 3 p.m. Thursday. Smoke was starting to build about 100 yards from their Ute Park home, and a fire was spreading fast.

"Within 20 minutes, it had probably covered 25 acres, and after that the wind just took it and it just blossomed to the west," Smith said. "Within an hour, the whole eastern part of Ute Park itself was involved in the fire."

Fire officials said the blaze continued to spread quickly Friday, more than doubling in size over the course of the day to cover 16,500 acres east of Taos.

The fire burned 14 unoccupied, non-residential structures at the Philmont Scout Ranch, according to Wendy Mason, the Wildfire Prevention & Communications Coordinator for the state Forestry Division.

Almost 300 structures were considered still in danger.

When Smith, the manager of the Eagle Nest senior center, saw the fire first blow up Thursday, he got into his car and went home. By the time he got there, law enforcement was already evacuating homes.

"The county people let us in, told us to pick up our stuff and move out," Smith said. "At that time, we moved out of the fire area, but just into the area west of the fire, and decided to wait there to see what was going to happen. And then about an hour after that they just evacuated all of Ute Park." Smith said he was told by fire personnel the wildfire was caused by a dry lightning strike that hit a tree on Tuesday but kept smoldering until the fire erupted on Thursday.

He said he was also told that it might be two more days before he and his wife could return home, which he said was untouched by the flames. When the couple arrived back in Eagle Nest, the American Red Cross was already turning the senior center into a shelter for evacuees.

Cindy Carr, a second-grade teacher at Eagle Nest Elementary School, was in Ute Park Thursday for the school district’s end-of-year picnic. After the evacuations, she and others at the school district got to work. She was at the school Friday helping take in donations. The family of one of the district’s employees had to leave their home in Ute Park, she said.

"I can’t imagine what they’re going through with their family," Carr said. "I don’t think we’ve had time to think about it yet. We’re just trying to do what we can do and be where we need to be when we need to be there."

Cell service down

Cellphone service was down between Eagle Nest and Taos starting Thursday night and continuing into Friday.

Taos-based Kit Carson Internet said in a Facebook post Thursday night that it was experiencing outages due to the Ute Park Fire. The company put out another post Friday afternoon saying the fire had "caused damages to upstream mainline bandwidth providers" and that in an attempt to restore cellular communications, Kit Carson would "briefly" drop services to condition a new line over a redundant route.

Firefighters, who were being staged at Eagle Nest Elementary, were handling important business on a landline telephone in the school’s main office.

"It’s been difficult to, first of all, know where to go, know who’s where, and then to coordinate what efforts are being focused where," Carr said. "Things are much less efficient because we have a lack of communication."

Lucas Brooks, a Red Cross Disaster Program Specialist, said a family of three adults and four children who were on vacation had to stay at the Eagle Nest shelter Thursday night.

"They were out hiking and couldn’t even go back to their cabin," Brooks said. "They didn’t have a change of clothes, they didn’t have ID or cash, so you can see the stress is taking its toll on them."

In addition to the shelter, hotels and lodges in Eagle Nest and Red River are offering free rooms to evacuees.

"This community is very good about opening their doors to people when something happens," Smith said. "It’s a community that cooperates and works together very well."

No containment

The fire was still zero percent contained as of 9 p.m., according to the Ute Park Fire Info website.

Shawn Jeffrey, the Cimarron town clerk administrator, said the village had ordered mandatory evacuations around 9 a.m. and Mayor Leo Martinez has declared the town to be in a state of emergency. As of Friday night, officials said the fire no longer posed a threat to Ute Park, and the community went from being under mandatory evacuation to advisory evacuation.

Friday morning, Jeffrey said the fire was still about two miles north of Cimarron, a town of about 1,100 in Colfax County about 50 miles east of Taos. Evacuees were told to head to the Raton Convention Center if they didn’t have family to stay with. The New Mexico chapter of the American Red Cross was supporting the center by bringing in supplies.

Evacuees from Philmont Boy Scout Ranch, which is under a voluntary evacuation, were directed to head to the fairgrounds in Springer, Jeffrey said.

She said she and the other village officials would stay at the village hall until everyone left. Village officials posted updates on Facebook throughout Friday, and community members added messages asking for or offering help with animals, transportation and supplies.

In a Facebook live video, village Councilor Matthew Gonzales urged the community to leave but not to panic.

"That does not mean jump into your car and speed out of town as quickly as possible," he said. "We’re not in imminent danger. We’re encouraging all members to start packing up their vehicles and heading out of town."

Firefighters were working to suppress the fire with support from two very large air tankers (VLAT), six heavy air tankers, and four helicopters.

The National Weather Service Albuquerque sent out an Air Quality Alert Message around 10:30 a.m. Friday.

"The Ute Park Wildfire in the Sangre de Cristo Mountains is producing significant amounts of dense smoke," according to the alert. "At 10:00 a.m., Colfax County Emergency Management reported very poor or near zero visibility as a result of the smoke in the areas immediately downwind from the fire, including the community of Cimarron."

Emergency info

Road closures: NM 64 is closed between Eagle Nest and Cimarron, as is NM 58 and NM 21 and State Route 204.

Evacuation centers: The Raton Convention Center at 901 S 3rd St, Raton, NM. Eagle Nest Senior Center at 74 N. Tomboy Dr., Eagle Nest, NM. The National Guard Armory in Springer at 23 Fairgrounds Rd, Springer NM.

Information: New Mexico Fire Information Cimarron, NM Info Board on Facebook

Other places to stay: Angel Fire Resort is offering free rooms at the Lodge at Angel Fire Resort. Private homes, condos and the RV Resort are being offered at heavily discounted rates. Call 575 377 4365.

___ (c)2018 the Albuquerque Journal (Albuquerque, N.M.) Visit the Albuquerque Journal (Albuquerque, N.M.) at www.abqjournal.com Distributed by Tribune Content Agency, LLC.

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May 28th Morning Rush: Veterans across New Mexico remembered on Memorial Day

ALBUQUERQUE, N.M. (KRQE) – 1. This Memorial Day we remember and honor the brave men and women who served our country and are no longer with us. The preparation for the annual Memorial Day ceremony at the Santa Fe National Cemetery began Friday morning. Hundreds of volunteers placed nearly 60,000 flags, one for each grave site. Those volunteers are school kids, businesses, family members and citizens who just want to thank those service members who gave the ultimate sacrifice. The Memorial Day ceremony in Santa Fe begins at 10 a.m.

Full Story: 2018 Memorial Day Closures, Events

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2. This week family members say funeral services will be held for the mom and daughter
that were found murdered in their Albuquerque apartment. Sunday, family and friends gathered to honor Deborah Montano and 17-year-old Irisa. The mom and daughter were found stabbed to death in their Albuquerque Westside apartment Thursday morning. Irisa had just graduated high school and was excited to start nursing school. The family says the suspected killer, was a family member the mom had been trying to get help for. Family members say funeral services will be held in Las Vegas, New Mexico.

Full Story: Family, friends hold vigil for double homicide victims

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3. Memorial Day will feature lots of sunshine across New Mexico! But with the sunny and dry conditions comes the heat. Albuquerque will top out in the upper 80s this afternoon, but the southeast will hit the triple digits. A cold front will edge into the northeast Tuesday, allowing for a few spot showers and storms.

Full Story: John’s Monday Morning Forecast

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4. Multiple fires are still burning in New Mexico, as crews try to make progress. At last check, the Buzzard Fire in a rugged area of the Gila National Forest has reached 15,000 acres. It’s now 10 percent contained. The Arena Canyon Fire, burning in San Juan County has reached 128 acres and is up to 40-percent containment. The Alamo Fire near Bandelier National Monument is 80 percent contained. The Kellar Fire in the Guadalupe Mountains has charred 25 acres so far.

Full Story: New Mexico Wildfires Coverage

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5. Two veterans are likely onto the next stop of their cross-country journey to raise awareness and money for veterans suffering from PTSD and suicide. Dustin Schnatz and Will Owens are traveling 3,000 miles from Imperial Beach, California to Virginia Beach. Over the weekend they made a stop in Albuquerque.

Full Story: Duo treks across country helping veterans

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Morning’s Top Stories

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Sturdy Homes Ltd. of Albuquerque New Mexico USA Introduces Affordable Tiny Steel Container Type Houses Along with Modular Customs Houses

Container Type Homes and Modular Steel Pre-Fabricated Homes made in China under specifications provided by Sturdy Homes Ltd. of Albuquerque NM USA.

Similarly, steel framed prefabricated houses are made to withstand high winds, fire and earthquakes.

Emphasis is on getting houses that are natural disaster proof.

The cost of these homes are 50 to 60% cheaper to build and can be erected in days rather than months. Labor costs are reduced by 60% as less labor is needed and install time is quick.

Container type houses, due to their low cost, can be used for backyards, grandma or mountain retreats as they have kitchen and shower facilities. They can also provide temporary housing for disaster areas as well as to accommodate the homeless population. Unlike freight containers that come in 8′ width for road transport, Study Homes are available in any width as they are not shipped on trucks. They are shipped in flat-packs for on site assembly.

Modular Steel Homes are mostly made to order and shipped in parts for onsite construction as per the customer’s requirement in containers. Any size, any design can be made. A typical 2,000 sq. ft house will cost around $110,000 in material and labor costs (without land). The house can be ready in 3 weeks for occupancy if building inspectors can keep up with the pace.

For more information visit www.sturdyhomes.com

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ABQ-area market offers fewer home listings, higher prices

New D.R. Horton homes are under construction in the Milagro Mesa subdivision in Rio Rancho. (Greg Sorber/Journal)

ALBUQUERQUE, N.M. — The spring home buying season in the Albuquerque metro area could be described this way: Fewer house listings, higher prices and faster deals.

It wasn’t just the weather that was heating up in Central New Mexico as April ended and May began. As the summer months approach, experts say home buyers should be prepared to face one of the most competitive selling seasons in years.

They say based on the number of single-family home transactions in April, demand will be intense. And that’s in an environment of rising home prices, mortgage rates and changes in the tax law that limit mortgage deductions.

While closed and pending sales were up in April from the previous year, there were fewer single-family homes to choose from, according to figures released this week by the Greater Albuquerque Association of Realtors.

The inventory of existing single-family homes for sale in the Albuquerque metro area shrunk more than 17 percent from last year in the GAAR coverage area, a region that includes Bernalillo, Valencia, Sandoval, Torrance and parts of Socorro and Santa Fe counties.

Even the number of condos and townhomes on offer saw an inventory decline of 16.5 percent from April 2017, according to GAAR.

With more buyers vying for fewer single-family residences, prices continued to climb higher. The average sales price in this category rose 2.5 percent from April 2017 to $242,037. Also during this period, detached homes moved four days faster than last year, selling in 47 days.

Still, rising home prices have yet to squelch demand, especially for those on the first rung of the property ladder, said GAAR’s president in a recent interview with the Journal. Being quick with an offer is still the rule of the day in most metro area submarkets, said Danny Wm. Vigil, GAAR president. “The Greater Albuquerque market has proven to be a strong seller’s market for 2018 so far,” he said. Year to date, sellers are getting 98 percent of the list price, according to GAAR.

But buyers are still hungry, Vigil said, and competition for homes that show well and that are still on the market continues unabated.

Meanwhile, an indicator of new-home construction in the metro area saw its best month so far this year. According to DataTraq, 203 residential building permits were issued in April. Volume rose 55 percent from last April’s figure of 131 permits.

One industry observer said the April number is a “nice bump” in activity but he isn’t sure it means the beginning of an upward trend.

“I think (April’s permit activity) is more of a case of builders like D.R. Horton, Pulte and LGI trying to close existing subdivisons out,” said John Garcia, executive vice president of the Home Builders of Central New Mexico.

In the past year, hot spots for new-home buyers were the Mirehaven, Desert Sands, Saltillo and Los Diamantes sudvisions. These communities were issued the most residential building permits.

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Albuquerque Mayor Tim Keller gives State of the City address – Albuquerque Business First

Before he became mayor of Albuquerque, Tim Keller sat through his share of State of the City and State of the State addresses.

He learned how mayors and governors talk: mention how great the city or state is, discuss the problems and what’s holding it back, and end with big-picture concepts.

"It’s a pretty good formula for a speech," he said. "I want to do something a little bit different today."

Keller began his six-month State of the City update Monday as the NAIOP guest speaker at Albuquerque Marriott by saying the touristy photos of the city don’t always line up with reality.

"We’re a city that is stricken by addiction, that is dealing with real crime problems that are worse then they’ve been in recent years," Keller said. "We’re a city, I think, that is treading water just to keep up.

"It’s going to be a hot summer. It’s going to be a summer, I think unfortunately, no matter what we do today, [that] will be marked by homelessness, marked by crime and wildfires."

He said the city is long on ideas, but short on solutions, and said it cannot rely on bigger companies, or "silver bullets," to save it.

Keller laid out three tasks that should Albuquerque solve, it could compete with cities like Denver, Phoenix and Austin in neighboring states: get crime under control, figure out strategic placemaking with businesses and place a higher emphasis on after-school and youth summer programs. Placemaking is strategically placing economic development projects where they benefit the surrounding community.

The mayor said the city submitted a budget that will have the resources to beef up the police enough to make a dent in crime, should it get passed, drawing applause from the audience at the meeting hosted by NAIOP, a commercial real estate development association.

For each public project the city will explore, Keller said he will ask if it builds on Albuquerque’s core, if it’s part of a growing trend nationally, if it will help the city become a national leader in something, if it will add economic-based jobs that will pull money into the city rather than dividing it, and if it will be a part of strategic placemaking.

"That’s how we make step-change development in Albuquerque," the mayor said.

Keller touched on his new initiative to review all out-of-state contracts and said he hoped businesses in the audience could land some of the contracts that come up for grabs.

When Keller was state auditor, a transparency report from his office found that New Mexico’s information technology industry had the highest proportion of large contracts awarded out of state of any industry.

In fiscal year 2015, New Mexico spent about $40 million out of $48 million on IT contracts worth $60,000 or more outside the state, amounting to 84 cents of every dollar spent on IT going to outside companies, the report said.

"We have to actually try and hit the target, instead of looking for other solutions," Keller said Monday, "and to do this, we have to come together as one Albuquerque."

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GRAPHIC: Dad accused of prostituting young daughter in NM

A father in Albuquerque, NM, is facing human trafficking and child abuse charges after allegedly prostituting his 7-year-old daughter for drugs. (Source: KOAT/Albuquerque Police Department/CNN)

ALBUQUERQUE, NM (KOAT/CNN) – A father in New Mexico is facing several charges after being accused of forcing his 7-year-old daughter into prostitution.

Teachers at the girl’s school alerted officials to launch an investigation, but it was months before action was taken to protect the child.

"My immediate reaction as a mom, and as a human, is just absolute disgust and heartbreak," said Monique Jacobson, the cabinet secretary for the New Mexico Child, Youth and Families Department – or CYFD.

The man is behind bars after New Mexico’s attorney general said he prostituted his 7-year-old daughter for drugs.

Court documents said the little girl is homeless and would show up to Lew Wallace Elementary School, exhausted and disheveled, telling teachers: "Mom and I hustle."

Back in November, the criminal complaint said a teacher called police when she noticed dried blood on the girl’s underwear. Police took a report and notified CYFD.

But the little girl and her brother stayed with their parents.

Documents show the Albuquerque Police Department talked to the family at a nearby motel and said there was "nothing that could cause concern of either of these children being abused in any way by their parents."

Six months later, New Mexico Attorney General Hector Balderas became involved because a school nurse said she was worried about the little girl.

Investigators talked with the 7-year-old and her brother.

According to court documents, their father prostituted the girl and made both children panhandle and steal.

Balderas is angry that nothing happened to help the children six months ago.

"There absolutely just need to be earlier interventions when it comes to protecting young children," Balderas said.

CYFD has ordered an internal review. If something was done incorrectly, they said the right people will be held accountable.

"We’re still – from our perspective – doing a real deep dive into all of that," Jacobson said.

APD said they’re still looking into what happened on their end. Balderas said that’s simply not good enough.

"These types of agencies need to take some responsibility in evaluating all of these cases, but there clearly needs to be timelier interventions when it comes to protecting children," Balderas said.

James Stewart, the father, is facing human trafficking and child abuse charges. It’s unclear if the mother will be charged.

Balderas gave credit to school faculty and staff for contacting authorities. He said they likely saved the girl’s life.

CYFD officials said they’re unable to remove children from their parents until they’re ordered to do so by a judge or law enforcement.

Copyright 2018 KOAT via CNN. All rights reserved.

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GRAPHIC: Dad accused of prostituting young daughter in NM

A father in Albuquerque, NM, is facing human trafficking and child abuse charges after allegedly prostituting his 7-year-old daughter for drugs. (Source: KOAT/Albuquerque Police Department/CNN)

ALBUQUERQUE, NM (KOAT/CNN) – A father in New Mexico is facing several charges after being accused of forcing his 7-year-old daughter into prostitution.

Teachers at the girl’s school alerted officials to launch an investigation, but it was months before action was taken to protect the child.

"My immediate reaction as a mom, and as a human, is just absolute disgust and heartbreak," said Monique Jacobson, the cabinet secretary for the New Mexico Child, Youth and Families Department – or CYFD.

The man is behind bars after New Mexico’s attorney general said he prostituted his 7-year-old daughter for drugs.

Court documents said the little girl is homeless and would show up to Lew Wallace Elementary School, exhausted and disheveled, telling teachers: "Mom and I hustle."

Back in November, the criminal complaint said a teacher called police when she noticed dried blood on the girl’s underwear. Police took a report and notified CYFD.

But the little girl and her brother stayed with their parents.

Documents show the Albuquerque Police Department talked to the family at a nearby motel and said there was "nothing that could cause concern of either of these children being abused in any way by their parents."

Six months later, New Mexico Attorney General Hector Balderas became involved because a school nurse said she was worried about the little girl.

Investigators talked with the 7-year-old and her brother.

According to court documents, their father prostituted the girl and made both children panhandle and steal.

Balderas is angry that nothing happened to help the children six months ago.

"There absolutely just need to be earlier interventions when it comes to protecting young children," Balderas said.

CYFD has ordered an internal review. If something was done incorrectly, they said the right people will be held accountable.

"We’re still – from our perspective – doing a real deep dive into all of that," Jacobson said.

APD said they’re still looking into what happened on their end. Balderas said that’s simply not good enough.

"These types of agencies need to take some responsibility in evaluating all of these cases, but there clearly needs to be timelier interventions when it comes to protecting children," Balderas said.

James Stewart, the father, is facing human trafficking and child abuse charges. It’s unclear if the mother will be charged.

Balderas gave credit to school faculty and staff for contacting authorities. He said they likely saved the girl’s life.

CYFD officials said they’re unable to remove children from their parents until they’re ordered to do so by a judge or law enforcement.

Copyright 2018 KOAT via CNN. All rights reserved.

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Albuquerque, NM Real Estate: Foreclosures

Foreclosures listed for sale in and around Albuquerque could provide opportunities to move into a home you couldn’t afford otherwise. Foreclosures for sale are still being listed regularly all across New Mexico, including in Albuquerque.

So where can you find foreclosures in Albuquerque? Here’s a look at the most recent listings from our partners at realtor.com.

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Contractor’s tiny homes may help solve housing problem

ALBUQUERQUE, N.M. – New Mexico is not immune to a housing shortage being felt across the country.

A new report from the National Low Income Housing Coalition found “no state has an adequate supply of affordable rental housing for the lowest income renters.”

In New Mexico, the report shows there are 43 affordable and available rental homes for every 100 renter who makes 30 percent or less than their area’s median income. It’s a number that doesn’t surprise Santa Fe contractor Zane Fischer.

“We’re not looking at a problem coming down the road,” said Fischer. “We’re waking up to a problem in the middle of it.”

Fischer is the CEO of Extraordinary Structures. He’s focused on creating an efficient, affordable way to build energy-smart homes. Usually, that means fewer square feet.

“Smaller homes is less area to heat and to cool, not to mention vacuum which we all enjoy a break from every once in a while,” said Fischer. “But the other end is figuring out how to, you know, not necessarily do huge high rise apartment blocks, but if we can make pocket neighborhoods or compact communities where we’re living in smaller houses with shared open space we can maximize our resources and kind of create those neighborhoods of yesteryear and those European neighborhoods that we all find still have so much charm,” said Fischer.

A 200-square-foot tiny house sits just outside their Santa Fe workshop. Fischer says it already sold for $80,000.

Like anything else, to reduce the cost of housing, you need to increase supply. Fischer says many zoning regulations prevent the construction of high-density housing.

“There is zoning that’s creating problems that limit us from building casitas, from doing smart density, from doing fourplexes and duplexes, and finding other ways of smart, beautiful, character-rich urban living,” said Fischer.

Fischer says he is already seeing some positive changes in New Mexico. He says Albuquerque’s new zoning code is a step in the right direction, and he believes Santa Fe’s new administration is making affordable housing a priority.“We need to move really fast and create bold solutions,” said Fischer. “A big part of that is going to be political will. It’s our mayors and our city councilors and representative saying, ‘we’re making changes and not all of them are going to be popular but we have to do this for the good of everyone,’" said Fischer.

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$2.7 Million Homes in Massachusetts, Idaho and New Mexico

Concord, Mass.

WHAT A house with six bedrooms and five and a half bathrooms

HOW MUCH $2.699 million

SIZE 5,467 square feet

PRICE PER SQUARE FOOT $494

SETTING This 1860 home, a former setting of a school for young children, is on the edge of Concord’s historic district, a 10-minute walk from the center of town and less than an hour northwest of Boston.

INDOORS A builder who acquired the house in 2004 performed a gut renovation, adding a large mudroom and an attached two-car garage with an upstairs bonus room. The current owners bought the property in 2012 and chose the lively wall colors.

The front door, which retains the push-bar on the inside from schoolhouse days, opens to a center hall. On the right is a burgundy-colored living and dining room with bay windows and decorative columns. On the left is a lavender parlor, formerly used as a faculty lounge, that serves as an office. The large kitchen flows into a second dining room and a family room with a fireplace; all are painted spring green.

Upstairs, the bay-windowed master suite has walk-in closets, a sitting room and a bathroom with marble flooring. Three additional bedrooms and two bathrooms are on the second floor; two bedrooms, a playroom and a bathroom are on the third floor.

The finished space under the gabled garage roof has a stone fireplace and a full bathroom.

OUTDOOR SPACE Sliding doors from the family room lead to a new stone patio and a fenced yard. The house sits on more than half an acre.

TAXES $28,810

CONTACT Sharon Mendosa, Mendosa-Balboni Team, Engel & Völkers, 978-580-0386; concord.evusa.com

David Fish/Blu Fish Photography
Boise, Idaho

WHAT A medieval-style castle with five bedrooms, five full bathrooms, two half bathrooms and a suit of armor

HOW MUCH $2.675 million (Bitcoin is accepted)

SIZE 5,845 square feet

PRICE PER SQUARE FOOT $458

SETTING Completed in 2011, the castle is in the East End neighborhood of Boise, on a street where houses have historically been warmed by underground hot springs. It is about two miles southeast of the Idaho state capitol building; downtown is visible from the crenelated roof. The building is made of sandstone, 90 percent of it quarried locally.

INDOORS Passing under a fixed iron portcullis, and pushing open a 220-pound door, one enters a foyer with a full suit of plate mail standing in a niche. (The armor goes by the name George and comes with the house.) The surrounding rooms have reclaimed hardwood floors and beams, plaster walls and a thoroughgoing baronial vibe. The living room fireplace is massive; the circular dining room befits a King Arthur-style table; and the gourmet kitchen has its own kitchen (a butler’s pantry with an island, a refrigerator and a copper sink). All of the floors have radiant heat.

The entire level upstairs is taken up by a master suite that includes a bedroom with leather walls and a fireplace; a walk-in closet; a bathroom with a plunge tub, steam room and shower room; an exercise room; a home theater with a wet bar; and an office.

Two additional bedrooms and bathrooms, as well as a second theater and a wine cellar, are on the first level, below the main floor. The top, or fourth, level has a roof deck. An elevator operates between all four floors, but you can also walk the 76 steps in the main tower.

A three-car garage that is attached to the house by a breezeway (downstairs) and a catwalk (upstairs) has a one-bedroom apartment with a full-size kitchen, living area and bathroom.

OUTDOOR SPACE The building sits on .37 acre and has a large stone patio in the backyard. The multilevel roof terrace, which can be lighted at night with flaming torches, includes an outdoor kitchen, a firepit, a bar, a jetted tub, a dragon fountain and a greenhouse.

TAXES $19,977 (2017)

CONTACT Missy Coman, Group One Sotheby’s International Realty, 208-484-8617; sothebysrealty.com

Ed Macias
Abiquiú, N.M.

WHAT A 58-acre riverfront complex built in 1996 with a two-bedroom main house, a guesthouse with two units and a vineyard

HOW MUCH $2.7 million

SIZE 3,325 square feet

PRICE PER SQUARE FOOT $812

SETTING The property is a mile and a half northeast of Abiquiú, a tiny place whose most famous resident was the artist Georgia O’Keeffe. It is about two hours by car from the Albuquerque airport and about an hour from Santa Fe.

INDOORS The main house has 16-inch-thick walls of Pumice-Crete, concrete floors, a metal roof with skylights and a screened porch. The central living area has pine cabinets and beams, a fireplace whose chimney rises to the top of the vaulted ceiling and an open kitchen with a white-quartz-topped peninsula. A dining room is off to the side.

This level also has a bedroom with a walk-in closet, a full bathroom and a powder room. A second bedroom and a study are upstairs in a loft-like space with a balcony overlooking the main floor.

A separate guesthouse shaded by a long veranda has two casitas, each with a private entrance, a full bathroom with Mexican tile and a wood-burning fireplace.

OUTDOOR SPACE In addition to the vineyard with its more than 6,000 vines, the property has strawberry and asparagus plants, alfalfa fields, a cottonwood grove, lines of poplar trees, flower gardens and a chicken coop. The Chama River runs along the border.

TAXES $7,229

CONTACT Emery or Dolores Maez, Keller Williams Realty, 505-469-0546; kw.com

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